English Department

Courses

How does attending a few Broadway shows in New York City sound? Or what about reading fantasy literature by authors such as J.R.R. Tolkien and Madeleine L'Engle? Does delving into literary greats such as Shakespeare, Milton, Dickens, Hawthorne, Melville, Faulkner, and Woolf interest you? The English department offers courses covering all of these subjects and many more.

Our curriculum is designed to inculcate in our students what T. S. Eliot calls “the historical sense,” an appreciation of the major currents in the great literature of civilization.  To this end, we begin with survey courses in English, American, and world literature and then move to courses in more specific genres and periods of literature.

*For the most recent listing of courses see the current GCC Bulletin.


 

Major and Minor Requirements

Course Requirements for a Bachelor of Arts Degree in English (36 hours) - Status Sheet

English Core Requirements (21 hours):

  • English 201-202, 203-204.
  • One Shakespeare course: either English 351 or 352.
  • One writing course: either English 371 or 381.
  • One course from either English 402 or 450.
  • Genre literature course (3 hours):
  • Choose one from English 220, 222, 230, 242, 243, 245, 250, 252, 260, or 262.
  • Period courses (12 hours):
  • Choose four from English 205, 206, 245, 246, 302, 304, 306, 308, 312, 314, 318, 324, 325, 327, 351, or 352.
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Course Requirements for English Major leading to (7-12) teaching certification in English - Status Sheet

Core Requirements (35 hours):

  • English 201-202, 203-204, 205 or 206, 371, 381, 401, and 402.
  • Shakespeare course: either English 351 or 352.
  • One period course: choose from English 205, 206, 245, 302, 304, 306, 308, 312, 314, 318, 324, 325, 327, 351, or 352.
  • One Genre course: choose from English 220, 222, 230, 242, 243, 246, 250*, 252, 260, or 262.

Education Core (42 hours):

  • Education 201, 202, 305, 308, 330, 361, 371, 431, and 488.
  • Communication 104; Psychology 102; Computer Science 204.
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Course Requirements for English Major leading to (7-12) teaching certification in English and Communication - Status Sheet

All courses required for above English Major leading to (7-12) teaching certification in English, plus the following:

Communication Core (6 hours):

  • Six (6) credits from any one of the following three areas:
    • Speech: Communication 251, 303, or English 355.
    • Media: Communication 222, 235, 350, or 378.
    • Theatre*: English 252, Communication 251, 259 (one credit course must be taken three times), or 261.

*Students who elect the “Theatre” option must take English 250 to fulfill the Genre requirement.


Advanced Placement credits in English do not count toward English major requirements. They do, however, count as elective credits toward graduation.

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Course Requirements for a minor in English

A minor in English will consist of any six three-credit courses (18 credit hours) in literature, excluding English 102, 355, 371, 381 and 401. Advanced Placement credits will not count toward the 18 hours.

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Course Requirements for a minor in Theatre

This minor is open to all students with a love for theatre and an interest in supplementing their academic major with a program that will develop appreciation of dramatic literature, public communication skills, and skills in the various crafts of the theatre. Twenty four hours are required, including:

  • Theatre Core (12 hours): English 250, Theatre 250, Theatre 251, Theatre 261, and 3 semesters of Theatre 259.
  • Elective options (12 hours): Choose twelve hours from the following: English 252, 302, 351, 352, Theatre 255, 262, 320, or 351.
  • Theatre or English 290, 390, 460 or 480 courses may also count if they relate directly to theatre studies and are approved by the department chair. 
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Course Requirements for a minor in Interdisciplinary Classics

Consult the Philosophy section in the Department of Religion and Philosophy for the 21-hour requirements.

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Courses Available

Survey Courses

201. ENGLISH LITERATURE SURVEY I

The first semester of the two-semester survey of English literature focuses on the major authors and representative works of each period from the early Middle Ages (Beowulf) to the 18th century.  This course also fulfills the Writing Intensive (WI) and Information Literacy (IL) requirements for the English major.  As such, it is the foundational course for the English major and should be taken in the first semester of the program.

Fall semester course, three hours each semester.

 

202. ENGLISH LITERATURE SURVEY II

The second semester of the two-semester survey of English literature focuses on the major authors and representative works of each period from the late 18th century to the modern era.  Prerequisite: English 201.

Spring semester course, three hours.

 

203. AMERICAN LITERATURE SURVEY I

The first semester of the two-semester survey of American literature focuses on representative works from the time of the discovery of America to the Civil War.  Attention is concentrated on major writers and their works in each period with some consideration given to all genres except drama.  English majors are strongly encouraged to take 203 before 204.

Fall semester course, three hours.

 

204. AMERICAN LITERATURE SURVEY II

The second semester of the two-semester survey of American literature focuses on representative works from post-Civil War to the late 20th century.  Attention is concentrated on major writers and their works in each period with some consideration given to all genres except drama.  Non-English majors may enroll in 204 without having taken 203, but English majors are strongly encouraged to take 203 before 204.

Spring semester course, three hours.

 

205. WORLD LITERATURE SURVEY: ASIA

A survey of representative authors and works of Asia, with a special focus on the literature of China, India, and Japan.  The 205-206 survey is designed to include works of cultures and regions not covered by the English and American literature surveys of the classical and European literature in the required Humanities 202: Civilization & Literature.  Students may take either or both courses, in either sequence.

Fall semester course, three hours.

 

206. WORLD LITERATURE SURVEY: AFRICA & LATIN AMERICA

A survey of representative authors and literary works of Africa and Latin America, including the Caribbean.  The 205-206 survey is designed to include works of cultures and regions not covered by the English and American literature surveys of the classical and European literature in the required Humanities 202: Civilization & Literature.  Students may take either or both courses, in either sequence.

Spring semester course, three hours.

 

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Genre Studies

220. POPULAR LITERATURE.

A survey of one of the genres of popular literature: Science Fiction, Fantasy, the Western, and the Detective Story. In addition to studying major works in the genre, students examine the origins and cultural impact of the genre. (Each genre will have its own listing between 220 and 229.)

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

222. FANTASY LITERATURE.

This course is designed to introduce students to the major features that characterize fantasy as a literary genre. Students will read 16-18 fantasy novels, including authors such as C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, Madeleine L’Engle, Ursula LeGuin, and J. K. Rowling. Class time will be spent analyzing these novels and critiquing them as works of literature.

Offered alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

 

230. SHORT STORY.

A study of the short story as a literary form, from the beginnings of the form to the present.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

242. 19th CENTURY ENGLISH NOVEL.

A study of major works by authors from the great age of the English novel, including Austen, the Brontes, Dickens, Eliot, Hardy, Conrad, and Wilde.

Fall semester only, three hours.

 

245. 19th CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL.

This course explores the romances of Hawthorne and Melville; the regionalism of Mark Twain; the realism of James and Chopin; and the naturalism of London, Norris, and Crane. Prerequisite for English majors: English 203 and 204. (None for non-English majors.)

Offered alternate Fall semesters, three hours.

 

246. 20th CENTURY AMERICAN NOVEL.

This course gives students experience with the long fiction of such writers as Cather, Hemingway, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Lewis, Steinbeck, Ellison, and others. Prerequisite for English majors: English 204. (None for non-English majors.)

Offered alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

 

250. WORLD DRAMA.

An introduction to the great playwrights and representative plays of world drama from the Greeks to the present. Students study elements of plot, characterization, and idea in each of the plays studied. The course also focuses on the theatrical and historical context of each play and playwright.

Fall semester only, three hours.

 

252. MODERN DRAMA.

A study of major plays and playwrights of the twentieth century, including Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, O'Neill, Beckett, Brecht, and recent American and British playwrights.

Offered alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

 

260. POETRY.

This course explores a wide range of traditional and contemporary poetry; gives insight into ways poets use imagery, rhyme, meter, persona, and sound qualities to create meaning in poetry; provides experience with prosody and with problems in translation; and offers in-depth experience with the work of selected poets.

Fall semester only, three hours.

 

262. MODERN POETRY.

This course provides a more intensive examination of the poets and poetry of the 20th century. Students will examine the most significant movements in poetry of this period, including Modernism in the first half of the century and post-modern experiments of recent decades.

Offered alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

 

290. STUDIES IN LITERATURE.

Subject matter varies each semester, to allow an in-depth study of authors and works of literature not covered in as much detail in other courses.

Semester course, three hours.

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Period Studies

304. CHAUCER AND THE MIDDLE AGES.

A study of the major works of ancient Greek and Roman literature with particular emphasis on the epic and tragedy and on the influence of classical literature on later Western literature.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

302. CLASSICAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION.

An introduction to the literature and art of the Middle Ages, from Beowulf, through Sir Gawain and the Green Knight and The Canterbury Tales, to the religious drama of the later Middle Ages. Prerequisite: English 201.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

302. CLASSICAL LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION.

A study of the major works of ancient Greek and Roman literature with particular emphasis on the epic and tragedy and on the influence of classical literature on later Western literature.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

306. ENGLISH RENAISSANCE: SPENSER TO MILTON.

A survey of major English writers of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries from Spenser, Donne, and Jonson to John Milton. Prerequisite for English majors: English 201. (None for non-English majors.)

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

308. RESTORATION AND 18th CENTURY LITERATURE.

An introduction to the works of principle authors from 1660 to 1750 such as Dryden, Pope, Swift, and Johnson. The simultaneous codification of rules and outbreak of the Romantic temper will be traced. Prerequisite: English 201.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

312. ROMANTIC LITERATURE.

An intensive examination of the poetry of the six major English Romantic poets of the early nineteenth century: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats. Students also read major critical prose by and about these poets. Prerequisite for English majors: English 202. (None for non-English majors.)

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

314. THE VICTORIAN MIND.

An examination of the intellectual trends of the nineteenth century with special emphasis on the roots of contemporary problems, British and American, through the major poets and other selected commentators. Prerequisite: English 202.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

318. NEW ENGLAND RENAISSANCE.

An opportunity for students to explore an unusually productive phase in the history of ideas in America through literature of outstanding quality including works of Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, and Melville. The dynamics of interaction among members of that group will be studied. Prerequisite for English majors: English 203. (None for non-English majors.)

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

324. EUROPEAN LITERATURE.

A study of European fiction in translation, with major emphasis on the novel, highlighting the work of writers such as Flaubert, Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, and Mann.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

325. CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE.

A study of American, European and world poetry and fiction of the last three decades, with particular emphasis on authors being read currently.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

 

327. MODERN CHRISTIAN WRITERS.

This course acquaints students with a wide variety of writers from the mid nineteenth century to the end of the twentieth century whose works express Christianity in significant ways. It examines the question of how a Christian world view impacts the way a writer functions as an artist. Operating on the premise that there is a place for many kinds of literary genius in the kingdom of God, this course challenges students intellectually and spiritually.

Offered alternate falls, semester course, three hours.

 

351-352. SHAKESPEARE.

Examination and analysis of the major drama and poetry of William Shakespeare. Each semester focuses on nine or ten of the major plays, selected from the comedies, histories, tragedies and romances. Class discussion is supplemented with viewing and discussion of films of the plays under study. Students may take one or two semesters, in either sequence. Prerequisite for English majors: English 201. (None for non-English majors.)

Semester course, three hours each semester.

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Special Studies

102. EFFECTIVE WRITING.

A basic college level review course for students referred by instructors and/or advisors. Major emphasis is on grammar review and polishing skills of effective expository writing. Provision is made for individual conferences.

Semester course, three hours.

 

254. THEATRE AND THEOLOGY.

A study of current Broadway and off-Broadway theatre productions in New York City. Students see five productions, normally in the second week of January and meet every morning to discuss the theological and theatrical implications of these productions. Students must write a ten-page paper in response to these issues.

Intersession course, one hour.

 

355. ORAL INTERPRETATION OF LITERATURE.

Techniques in reading aloud for audience enjoyment. Oral readings are given in the areas of fiction, poetry and drama. Each student prepares and performs a final fifteen-minute recital.

Semester course, three hours.

 

371. CREATIVE WRITING.

An exploration of a wide variety of the forms available in discovering one's own writing style: stories, scripts, essays, and poems. Informal lectures and discussions center on work done in class, and students are aided in finding an audience for their work.

Semester course, three hours.

 

401. DEVELOPMENTAL READING.

Required of, and limited to, department majors seeking certification, this course orients future teachers to reading problems in the classroom; their identification, cause, and effect; and the techniques of reading improvement. Emphasis is on in-class application as an adjunct of the normal classroom subject matter. Prerequisite: English/Secondary Education major.

Semester course, two hours.

 

402. GRAMMAR AND HISTORY OF ENGLISH.

Required of English majors seeking secondary certification in English, this course offers an introduction to the history of the English language, a review of traditional grammar, and presentation of a working knowledge of modern grammar.

Semester course, three hours.

 

450. LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY.

A detailed examination of the major literary critics and theorists of Western civilization. Part one is devoted to key figures of the Classical tradition; Part two uses basic tenets of that tradition to critique the "new wave" of critical theory. The class employs a seminar format; students lead discussion on a rotating basis and are expected to contribute significantly to every discussion. Essential for all students considering graduate study in English. Prerequisite: junior or senior English major.

Semester course, three hours.

 

460. INDEPENDENT STUDY.

An opportunity for students with extensive background in literature to do intensive independent study or research on specialized topics. Prerequisite: junior or senior English major and permission of the instructor. Application deadline: end of the semester preceding the proposed study.

Semester course, one, two or three hours.

 

480. INTERNSHIP IN ENGLISH.

Students majoring in English may, with prior consent of the department, earn academic credit for work done (normally off campus) under the direct supervision of a professional in an English-related field. This includes but is not limited to such fields as publishing, library science, journalism, technical writing, and script writing. Students must keep a daily log of activities and submit an academic paper summarizing the experience. A maximum of six credits of internship may apply toward graduation.

Semester course, one to six hours.

 

488. HONORS SEMINAR.

An advanced course for junior and senior English majors to concentrate on specific subject matter to be determined by the instructor. Individual research and extensive oral and written reports are required.

Semester course, three hours.

 

499. HONORS IN ENGLISH.

Seniors who have shown special aptitude in literature may, with consent of the department, undertake this course on an individual basis. The format is similar to that of the independent study, but students must also submit their papers to the entire English faculty and provide an oral presentation and defense of their research.

Semester course, one, two or three hours.

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