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Course Catalog

Courses

The history department here at Grove City offers a wide variety of history courses. Below is a list of the courses the History Department at Grove City College has to offer. Descriptions are taken directly from the college catalog.

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120. FOUNDATIONS OF HISTORY. An introduction to the principal theories, ideas, concepts, methods, and debates that have shaped the discipline of history. The course will examine competing perspectives of history, human nature, and providence. It will analyze how historians use and evaluate evidence and will provide a Christian perspective on history. Semester course, three hours.

141. WORLD GEOGRAPHY. An exploration of the physical and human geography of the globe. Semester course, three hours.

143. WORLD HISTORY I. A survey of the basic history of world societies from the earliest recorded development of human civilizations to the early modern period. As an Information Literacy (IL) course, it will emphasize designing historical research questions; finding, evaluating, and using primary and secondary sources; citing sources properly; and writing a cogent paper. Fall semester only, three hours.

144. WORLD HISTORY II. A survey of the history of world societies from the early modern period to the present. Special emphasis is given to the interrelationship between the Western world and the non-Western world. Spring semester only, three hours.

201. HISTORIOGRAPHY. An introduction to the art and craft of history. Through readings and discussions, students will learn the basics of the discipline of history, focusing on what historians do and have done, the essential concepts and methodologies they use, and the vocabularies they employ. Students will sharpen the skills essential for historical understanding: critical reading, effective analysis, and excellent writing. This course fulfills the Writing Intensive (WI), Speaking Intensive (SI), and Information Literacy (IL) requirements for History and SESS majors. Semester course, three hours.

207. THE ANCIENT WORLD. A survey of ancient Near Eastern, Mediterranean, and European cultures with emphasis on the formation of empires. The course explores the varied cultural legacies of ancient civilizations. Alternate Fall semesters, three hours.

208. MEDIEVAL EUROPE. A survey of Europe from the end of the Roman Empire to the early fifteenth century emphasizing the cultural and intellectual legacy of the Middle Ages. Alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

209. RENAISSANCE AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE. An examination of the Renaissance, the formation of nation states in the fifteenth century, the Reformation of the sixteenth century, and the political, social, and intellectual origins of modern Europe before the French Revolution. Fall semester only, three hours.

212. MODERN EUROPE. An examination of European states from the French Revolution through the periods of reaction and revolution, the growth of industrial society, and the global wars of the twentieth century. Spring semester only, three hours.

223. MODERN ASIAN HISTORY. A survey of political, social, economic, and cultural trends in East Asia from 1800 to the present, focusing primarily upon China, Korea, Japan and Vietnam. After examining the major tenets of East Asian civilization, the course explores the interaction of Asian nations with Western nations in the nineteenth century. It also examines the political, economic, and military conflicts of the twentieth century and concludes by focusing on the tremendous economic development that has shaped the region in recent decades. Alternate Fall semesters, three hours.

231. MODERN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY. An examination of Latin American struggles since 1800 to create effective national, political, and economic systems in a post-colonial global context. The course will explore how gender, racial, ethnic, and class differences undergird Latin American political and economic structures and how this historical relationship contributes to recent characteristics of the region, especially underdevelopment, dictatorship, guerrilla warfare, drug trafficking, democratization, and trade. Alternate Fall semesters, three hours.

251. UNITED STATES SURVEY I. A survey of American history from its European origins through Reconstruction. Fall semester only, three hours.

252. UNITED STATES SURVEY II. A survey of American history from the end of Reconstruction until the present. Spring semester only, three hours.

261. BRITISH HISTORY TO 1781. A survey of British history with special emphasis on the development of the common law, the parliament, and the British constitution. Recommended for pre-law students. Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

262. BRITISH HISTORY SINCE 1781. A survey of British history with special emphasis on Britain as an imperial power and on political, social, and cultural developments at home. Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

271. HISTORY OF RUSSIA. A study of the social, economic, and political institutions from the Kievan state through tsarist Russia. Fall semester only, three hours.

272. 20TH CENTURY RUSSIA: THE RISE AND FALL OF THE SOVIET UNION. A study of the social, economic, and political institutions of Russia from late tsarist Russia through revolutionary Russia and the rise and fall of the Soviet Union. Spring semester only, three hours.

283. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES TO 1876. An introductory survey of American history from its colonial origins until the end of Reconstruction. The course will examine political, social, economic, religious, and cultural developments. Fall semester only, three hours.

285. HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES SINCE 1877. An introductory survey of American history from the end of Reconstruction to the present. The course will examine political, social, economic, religious, and cultural developments. Spring semester only, three hours.

317. CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES I. A study of the development of the United States Constitution through use of the case study method. This course especially focuses on the constitutional powers of the three branches of government, the relationship between state and federal governmental powers, and property rights and economic liberties. Fall semester only, three hours.

318. CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES II. A study of the development of the United States Constitution through the use of the case study method. This course especially focuses on the idea of equality and the equal protection clause, due process, privacy and liberty rights, freedom of speech, press and religion and other Bill of Rights issues. Spring semester only, three hours.

336. UNITED STATES MILITARY HISTORY. A study of the socio-political, economic, technological and human aspects of war that traces the development of “the America way of war” from the early colonial period to the present. Alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

341. THE RISE OF CHRISTIANITY. This course analyzes Christianity as it grew from an obscure movement into a dynamic force which swamps the pagan cults of the Roman Empire. Major topics include Roman paganism, Roman religious policy, the growth and persecution of Christianity, tensions between Christianity and classical culture, and the development of early medieval Europe and Byzantium. Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

346. BYZANTIUM AND ISLAM. A thematic overview of the pre-modern Byzantine and Islamic worlds, from their common roots in the Mediterranean world of Late Antiquity to the establishment of the Islamic Empires and Kingdoms of the Near East, Asia, and Africa. The course traces the transformation, flourishing, and decline of Byzantium concurrently with the rise of Islam to world dominance. Alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

349. AMERICAN RELIGIOUS HISTORY. An exploration of religion in America that focuses on the various individuals and religious groups, events, ideas, and organizations that have had the most significant impact on American life. Alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

350. SPORTS IN AMERICAN HISTORY. An overview of sports in America from colonial times until the present, focusing especially on the relationship between sports and society and issues of race, class, and gender. Alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

357. MINORITIES IN AMERICAN HISTORY. An examination of the experience of minority groups in America focusing on Native Americans, immigrants, women, African Americans, and Asian Americans. The course analyzes the problems these groups experienced and their contributions to America. Spring semester only, three hours.

360. INDEPENDENT STUDY. An advanced course for students with substantial background in college history courses. Intensive and independent research into a particular historical question. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and department chairman. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

375. WORLD WARS I AND II. An exploration of the global impact of the two pivotal events of the twentieth-century world, examining the origins, events and ramifications of World Wars I and II. Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

376. ALEXANDER THE GREAT AND THE HELLENISTIC WORLD. An exploration of the life of Alexander the Great and the Hellenistic world created by his conquests. The course analyzes how the traditions of the Greeks were synthesized with the heritage of western Asia and northeast Africa to shape a world stretching from the Balkans to India. Alternate Spring semesters, three hours.

379. AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY. A study of American thought from the colonial era to the mid twentieth century. This course examines a variety of significant texts and key thinkers, seeking to understand them within their particular cultural contexts. Alternate Fall semesters, three hours.

390. STUDIES IN HISTORY. Specialized subject matter that varies each semester depending upon interests of the instructor and students. Semester course, three hours.

400. SENIOR RESEARCH SEMINAR. A seminar designed to take seniors methodically through the process of writing a substantial research paper in history. It includes selecting a topic, conducting research (mostly in primary sources), constructing a detailed outline, writing, and presenting a paper. This course fulfills the Writing Intensive (WI), Speaking Intensive (SI), and Information Literacy (IL) requirements for History majors. Semester course, three hours.

460. INDEPENDENT STUDY. An advanced course for students with substantial background in college history courses. Intensive and independent research into a particular historical question. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and department chairman. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

480. HISTORY INTERNSHIP. A semester of intensive study and work, usually off-campus, undertaken by the student with the approval of the faculty of the Department of History. A student must have a minimum QPA of 3.0 and may not have completed an internship in any other department, although exceptions may be made for a GCCI internship. The history student will be required to keep a journal of weekly activities and complete a project agreed upon with the Department. An internship in history may be taken at any institution in which Public History is practiced. Semester course, one to six hours.

488. SEMINAR IN HISTORY. An advanced course for junior and senior students desiring an in-depth exploration of one historical problem using individual research, discussion, oral reports, and written essays. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

499. HONORS IN HISTORY. Seniors who have shown special aptitude in history may, upon invitation and permission of the department, undertake special research in history. A written historical essay is required. Semester course, three hours.

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