Spanish

101. ELEMENTARY SPANISH I

102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH II
201. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I
202. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II
295. TRANSITIONAL SPANISH

300. Contemporary Culture

301. Introduction to Literature

303. ADVANCED CONVERSATION
304. NARRATION
305. PHONETICS AND LINGUISTICS
306. VERBS

310. Commercial Spanish

319. Introduction to Spanish Civilizations

320. MODERN SPAIN
322. LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE I
323. LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE II

326. Trends in Latin American Literature

327. Contemporary Latin American Authors

330. Genres of Spanish Literature I

331. GENRES OF SPANISH LITERATURE II

333. Contemporary Spanish Authors

340-341. Advanced Grammar for Proficiency I & II
362. ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE LEARNING
364. PEDAGOGICAL MATERIALS
375. Spanish for the Professions
390. STUDIES IN SPANISH
420. Written Translation and Simultaneous Oral Interpretation
424. Hispanics in the US
460. Independent Study
 

German

101. ELEMENTARY GERMAN I
102. ELEMENTARY GERMAN II
201. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I
202. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II
301-302. TECHNIQUES OF EFFECTIVE TRANSLATION.

310. Commercial German

316. Conversation

330. GERMAN CULTURE
334. ADVANCED GRAMMAR
390. STUDIES IN GERMAN.

460. Independent Study

 

French

101. Elementary French I

102. Elementary French II

201. Intermediate French I

202. Intermediate French II

305. Conversation

307. Principles of French Grammar and Style

308. PHONETICS AND LINGUISTICS.
309. ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION.
312. CONTEMPORARY FRANCE.
315. BUSINESS FRENCH

320. Genres of French Literature I

321. GENRES OF FRENCH LITERATURE II.
325. MODERN FRENCH THEATRE.
331. POETRY.
332. LA NOUVELLE FRANCOPHONE.
340. ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND CONTEMPORARY CULTURE.
362. ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE LEARNING.
364. PEDAGOGICAL MATERIALS.

380. LE CINÉMA PAR LA CONVERSATION

460. Independent Study
 

Chinese

101. ELEMENTARY CHINESE I
102. ELEMENTARY CHINESE II
105.Business Chinese I
201. INTERMEDIATE CHINESE I
202. INTERMEDIATE CHINESE II
205. BUSINESS CHINESE II
301. ADVANCED CHINESE I
302. ADVANCED CHINESE II
305. BUSINESS CHINESE III
320. INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE CIVILIZATION
321. MODERN CHINA
350. INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE LITERATURE
390. STUDIES IN CHINESE
401. ADVANCED CHINESE III
402. ADVANCED CHINESE IV
403. INTRODUCTION TO TO CLASSICAL CHINESE I
460. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CHINESE
 
 
 
 
 
 

French

101. Elementary French I. This course is intended for students who have not studied French before or who have had very little exposure to the language. Newly acquired vocabulary and grammatical structures will be practiced through general classroom discussions, small group, and pair work activities. Homework will require the interactive use of audio and video materials(s), as well as regular writing practice.  This course will also invite students to explore the Francophone world on the Internet.  Fall semester only, three hours

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 102. Elementary French II. Continuation of French 101. Appropriate also for students with one year of high school study with grades of B or better.  Continued acquisition of vocabulary and grammatical structures.  Students will be introduced to French and francophone culture(s) through authentic materials (simple articles, films, videos, songs, recorded conversations).  Students will be expected to hand in written assignments on a weekly basis.  Lab is to be completed on-line: it consists of audio, video material(s), and of written practice.  Students will continue to explore France and the francophone world on the Internet.  Prerequisite: French 101 or equivalent. Spring semester only, three hours

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 201. Intermediate French I. This course is appropriate for students who have completed 101 and 102, or 2 years of high school study with grades of B or better.  After a review of elementary French, this course proceeds with an intensive study of grammar and vocabulary aimed at developing all four skills: writing, reading, listening, and speaking.  Students will read fairly simple historical and literary texts; they will perform small skits, memorize a few poems, and explore cultural contexts of French and francophone communities.  Besides laboratory assignments and creative writing, students will do written exercises that will be checked on a weekly basis.  Prerequisite: French 102 or equivalent.  Fall semester only, three hours.

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 202. Intermediate French II. Continuation of French 201.  Appropriate also for students who have competed 3 years of high school study with grades of B or better.  The intermediate sequence is designed to help students attain a level of proficiency that should allow them to function comfortably in a French speaking environment.  This course will build on students’ existing skills in French and increase their confidence and ability to read, write, speak and understand French.  It will introduce them to more refined lexical items, more complex grammatical structures, and more challenging cultural materials.  Language laboratory practice will conclude each unit studied.  Written exercises done outside of class will be collected by the instructed and graded on a weekly basis.  Students will also write short papers in French.  Prerequisite: French 201 or equivalent. Spring semester only, three hours. 

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 305. Conversation. Introduction in speaking and understanding French in a variety of social and professional situations.  Required of French majors and those desiring teacher certification in French.  This course fulfills the Speaking Intensive (SI) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: French 202 or by permission.  Fall semester only, three hours. 

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 307.  PRINCIPLES OF FRENCH GRAMMAR AND STYLE.  This course aims at helping advanced students to develop further their linguistic skills and their ability to write creatively in the target language.  Through challenging exercises, examinations, and the writing of articles – the most outstanding ones to be featured in LE CERCLE FRANÇAIS – our (bi)yearly on-line publication, students gain continuous practice in speaking, reading, and writing the target language.  Review of material studied at earlier levels is incorporated throughout the semester. Emphasis is placed on the following grammatical topics: 1. Parts of speech and grammatical functions; 2. Adjectives (descriptive, possessive, demonstrative, and indefinite); 3. Pronouns (possessive, demonstrative, indefinite, and relative); 4.  Tenses of the indicative (present; passé composé, and imparfait); 5.  Present participle; 6.  Compound tenses; 7.  Pronominal verbs; 8.  Agreement of the past participle.  This course fulfills the Writing Intensive (WI) requirement for the French major.  Prerequisite: French 202 or a 300-level French course, or by permission.  Alternate fall semesters, three hours.

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 308. PHONETICS AND LINGUISTICS.  A systematic study of the sounds and sound patterns of French contrasted with English.  Each student’s pronunciation in French will be evaluated with exercises assigned to correct and improve it.  A theoretical and practical approach to the French phonetic system, this course includes phonetic transcriptions, an introduction to linguistics, and an overview of the history of the French language.  Required of French majors and those desiring teacher certification in French.  Prerequisites: French 202 or a 300-level French course, or by permission.  Spring semester only, three hours

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 309.  ADVANCED GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION.  The goal of this course is to enable advanced students to develop their linguistic skills and their ability to write creatively in French. Through challenging exercises, examinations, and the writing of articles – the most outstanding ones to be featured in LE CERCLE FRANÇAIS, our (bi)yearly on-line publication – students gain continuous practice in speaking, reading, and writing the target language.  Review of material studied at earlier levels is incorporated throughout the semester. Emphasis is placed on the following aspects of French grammar: 1. Nouns ; 2.  Articles; 3. Compound tenses (other than those studied in 307); Pronominal verbs; 4. Negatives; 5. Adverbs; 6. Conditional and passive voice; 7. Subjunctive; 8.  Prepositions and infinitive; 9.  Personal pronouns and imperative.  This course fulfills the Writing Intensive (WI) requirement for the French major.  Prerequisite: French 202 or a 300-level French course, or by permission.  Alternate fall semesters, three hours.

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 312.  CONTEMPORARY FRANCE.  Students enrolled in this course will gain access to contemporary France and to its people through readings and discussions (family, education, the arts, cinema and theater, history, and immigration).  Attention to daily life and traditions will foster a greater awareness of the differences and similarities existing between France and the United States. This course follows a tripartite organization: Geography, history (from the beginning of the third Republic [1875] to the present), government and institutions. Prerequisite: French grammar (307 or 309), or by permission.  Alternate fall semesters, three hours.

 

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315.  BUSINESS FRENCH.   Through this course, students will learn the linguistic skills and cultural information they need to prepare for the Chambre de commerce et d’industrie de Paris examinations, to conduct business in the Francophone world, to embark on a career in French or on a graduate cursus in International Business.  They will be exposed to key business French topics, to essential career practices, as well as to cultural concepts particular to French businesses. Areas of concentration are: 1. La correspondance; 2. La micro-informatique, Internet, le courrier électronique; 3. La recherche d’un emploi; 4.  La typologie des enterprises; 5. L’organisation des enterprises; 6. La mercatique/le marketing; 7.  La banque et les moyens de paiement; 8.  Les transports et le commerce international.  Prerequisite: French grammar 307 or 309, or by permission.  Alternate spring semesters, three hours.

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320. Genres of French Literature I.  A survey of French literature from the beginning of the eleventh century, to the end of the eighteenth century.  A study of French literary history, movements, authors, techniques, and themes, from the Song of Roland to Candide. Music and art of the periods will illustrate how the literature shares the same ideas and esthetics.  Prerequisite: French 202 or by permission. Offered periodically- semester course, three hours.

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 321. GENRES OF FRENCH LITERATURE II. A survey of French literature of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, from Romanticism to Duras and Robbe-Grillet. A study of French literary history, movements, authors, techniques, and themes of the last two centuries. Music and art of these periods will illustrate how the literature shares the same ideas and esthetics. It is not necessary to take French 320 before French 321. This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite: French 202 or by permission. Offered periodically- semester course, three hours.

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 325. MODERN FRENCH THEATRE.  A course designed to familiarize students with the major movements and authors of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, including the avant-garde, surrealism, l’antithéâtre (Theater of the Absurd), and francophone theatre.  This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major.  Prerequisite: French 202 or a 300-level French course, or by permission.  Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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330. WOMEN WRITERS IN FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE.  This course serves to introduce students to the lives and works of francophone female authors from 1800 to the present.  Its articulation is as follows: 1. Prise de conscience: Madame de Staël (France, Switzerland) and Simone de Beauvoir (France), with a side glance at Virginia Woolf (Great Britain); 2. Childhood and formation: Christiane Rochefort (France) and Nathalie Sarraute (France, Russia); 3. Sexual awakenings and passion: Colette (France) and Marguerite Duras (France and Indochina); 4. Matriarchy and exile: Antonine Maillet (Canada). The last third of the course focuses on the study of texts by the three authors whose work is commonly, albeit somewhat paradoxically, known as “French Feminism”: Luce Irigaray (Belgium), Hélène Cixous (Algeria), and Julia Kristeva (Bulgaria). This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major.  Prerequisite:  French grammar (307 or 309), or by permission. Alternate spring semesters, three hours.

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 331. POETRY.  The goal of this course is to enable students to express themselves in a more sophisticated and colorful language than had been hitherto feasible and to become acquainted with “explication de textes,” this staple of French classical education. Students will become familiar with the autobiographical and literary background of the following nineteenth and twentieth centuries French and francophone poets: Hugo, Nerval, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Verlaine, Rimbaud, Valéry, Senghor, Césaire.  This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major. Prerequisite:  French grammar (307 or 309), or by permission. Alternate spring semesters, three hours.

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 332.  LA NOUVELLE FRANCOPHONE.  A first goal of this course is to bridge the gap often experienced by students between the basic language work conducted during the first years of foreign language study and the diversified advanced work required of French majors.  A second goal is to have students acquire substantive information on francophone countries, as well as on writers of France and the French-speaking world: Maupassant (France), Flaubert (France), Sartre (France), Camus (Algeria), Sarraute (Russia, France), Gabrielle Roy (Canada), Antonine Maillet (Canada), Maryse Condé (Guadeloupe), and Zobel (Martinique). A third goal is to have students analyze short-story fiction (nouvelle/s) and, through discussions, regular assignments (questions and short essays), and the writing of a short story, demonstrate a greater sophistication and complexity in their manipulation of language skills and in their engagement with authentic texts. This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major.  Prerequisite:  French grammar (307 or 309), or by permission. Alternate spring semesters, three hours.

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 340.  ADVANCED CONVERSATION AND CONTEMPORARY CULTURE.  Practice in expanding skills and vocabulary acquired in French 305 through the discussion of current issues presented in French newspapers and TV5, International French TV.  Includes a study of colloquial French and an explanation of French culture and values today.  Students are encouraged to consult French news sources on the Internet and to get daily updates.  This course fulfills the Speaking Intensive (SI) requirement for the French major.  Prerequisites: French 202 or a 300-level French course, or by permission.  Strongly recommended: French 305.   Spring semester only, three hours.

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 362. ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE LEARNING.  A course designed to provide opportunities to teach various grammar aspects in the Spanish/French language, and to examine and implement a variety of technological aspects and resources in the foreign language curriculum in preparation for student teaching.  Teacher candidates will regularly reflect on their teaching experiences and will develop a portfolio of materials representing their teaching in the target language.  Required of all students desiring teacher certification in a foreign language.   Co-requisite:  French 364.Spring semester of the sophomore year, two hours.

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 364. PEDAGOGICAL MATERIALS. Introduction to the materials and resources of foreign language teaching.  Analysis and preparation of instructional and evaluative materials in a specific target language.  Required of all students desiring teacher certification in a foreign language.  Co-requisite:  French 362. Spring semester of the sophomore year, two hours.

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380  LE CINÉMA PAR LA CONVERSATION.  This course begins with analyses, commentaries, and discussions of French films with which spectators in non-francophone countries are most likely to be familiar.  Progressively, the emphasis shifts to films of the Occupation (1940-1944) and the Nouvelle Vague (the 1960s), films which have been held significant in aesthetic, social, or moral terms by the majority of critics and historians of French cinema.  The materials and strategies used are meant to stimulate interest in the target language, to bridge the gap between “skill” and research courses, and to develop the language proficiency of advanced students, as well as their ability to express themselves creatively in French.  This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the French major.  Prerequisite:  French grammar (307 or 309), or by permission.   Alternate fall semesters, three hours.

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 460. Independent Study. Individual study directed by a faculty member, with permission of the department chair. Semester course, one, two, or three hours.

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 German

101. ELEMENTARY GERMAN I. Intended for students who have not studied German or for those with minimal high-school study: grammar and vocabulary-building fundamentals, and basic conversation. Fall semester only, three hours.

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 102. ELEMENTARY GERMAN II. Appropriate for students who have studied German 101 or with one year of high-school study with grades of B or better. Continuation of grammar, vocabulary building, and basic conversation and reading. Prerequisite: German 101. Spring semester only, three hours.

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 201. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I. Appropriate for students who have completed two years of high school study with grades of B or better. Intensive study of grammar and vocabulary in oral and written practice and review of elementary German. Prerequisite: German 102. Fall semester only. three hours.

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 202. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II. Continuation of German 201. Understanding and speaking, grammar, and readings from selected texts. Prerequisite: German 201. Spring semester only, three hours.

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301-302. TECHNIQUES OF EFFECTIVE TRANSLATION. Training in effective techniques of translating German journals and books, including a review of grammar. Prerequisite: German 201. Offered periodically, two or three hours each semester.

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 316. Conversation. Instruction in speaking and understanding German in a variety of social and professional situations.  Acquisition of vocabulary will be emphasized.  Prerequisite: German 202. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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 330. GERMAN CULTURE. A survey of German history and civilization, including studies in geography, major eras of history, customs and cultural accomplishments. Prerequisite: German 202. Offered periodically, semester course , three hours.

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 334. ADVANCED GRAMMAR. A thorough review of the basic elements of German grammar and the study of finer grammatical points commonly omitted in review grammars. Prerequisite: German 202 or by permission. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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 390. STUDIES IN GERMAN. Readings and discussion of topics in literature or language. Subject matter varies. Semester course, two or three hours.

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 460. Independent Study. Individual study directed by a faculty member with the permission of the department chair.  Semester course, one, two or three hours.

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Spanish

101. ELEMENTARY SPANISH I. This course is intended for students with no previous study of Spanish or who have had minimal exposure to the language. An introduction to Spanish, stressing the spoken language and giving practice in grammar, reading, and writing. Fall semester only, three hours.

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 102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH II. Continuation of Spanish 101. Further development of basic communication skills including listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: Spanish 101. Spring semester only, three hours.

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 201. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I. This course is appropriate for students who have completed Spanish 101 and 102, or 2 years of high school study with grades of B or better. A review of elementary Spanish and an intensive study of grammar and vocabulary in oral and written practice, and readings from selected texts. Prerequisite: Spanish 102 or equivalent. Fall semester only, three hours.

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 202. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II. Continuation of Spanish 201. The intensive study of grammar and vocabulary in oral and written practice, and readings from selected texts. Further development of basic communication skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Prerequisite: Spanish 201. Spring semester only, three hours.

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 295. TRANSITIONAL SPANISH. An intermediate-level transitional course designed to help prepare students for advanced-level Spanish courses. This course will review, broaden, and solidify Spanish language proficiency, communication skills, and cultural awareness via increasingly more complex listening, speaking, reading, and writing tasks. Intended for students who have completed Spanish 202 or three years of high school Spanish. Semester course, three hours. Dr. Barber.

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 300. Contemporary Culture. A study of the contemporary Spanish-speaking world: geography, family life, beliefs and customs, education systems, religious perspectives, social questions, festivals and holidays.  Prerequisite: Spanish 295 or a 300-level Spanish course.  Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.   Srta Forrester

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 301. Introduction to Literature. Introduction to techniques of literary analysis and study of representative works by major authors of the Spanish-speaking world. This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL)  and Writing Intensive (WI) requirements for the Spanish major.  Prerequisite: Spanish 306.Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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 303. CONVERSATION. Training in oral expression with extensive vocabulary building. Study of grammatical structures in conversational and role-playing circumstances. Required of Spanish majors and those desiring teacher certification in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 295 or a 300-level Spanish course. Fall Semester only, three hours.

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 304. NARRATION. Exploration of the oral traditions of Spanish speaking regions and practice in storytelling in Spanish with an emphasis on the development of fluency, comprehensibility, intonation, and gesture. Prerequisite: Spanish 295 or a 300-level Spanish course. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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 305. PHONETICS AND LINGUISTICS. A systematic study of the sounds, sound patterns and intonations of Spanish, contrasted with English. Training in Spanish pronunciation, with special attention given to the problems teachers encounter in the classroom. Introduction to Spanish linguistic theory and terminology. Required of Spanish majors and those desiring teacher certification in Spanish. Prerequisite: Spanish 295 or by permission. Spring semester, three hours.

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 306. VERB CONSTRUCTS AND USAGE.  Exploration of Spanish verbs and their forms, modes and applications.  Designed to assist the development of written and oral competencies needed for Spanish 340, for Student Teaching, for graduate studies, and for the professional world.  Required of all Spanish majors and of those desiring teacher certification in Spanish.  Applicable to the requirements for a Spanish concentration in the Elementary Education major.  Prerequisite:  Spanish 295 or a 300-level Spanish course, or permission of the instructor.   Spring semester, three hours.

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 310. Commercial Spanish. Preparation for fundamental Spanish communication related to the fields of business and economics: applications, presentation, correspondence, advertising, reports, etc. Prerequisite: Spanish 295 or a 300-level Spanish course.  Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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 319. INTRODUCTION TO SPANISH CIVILIZATION.  A survey of Spanish history and civilization from pre-Roman times to the present.  Through readings, videos, discussions and presentations, students explore the social, political, economic and cultural developments of Spain and its people.  Prerequisite: Spanish 295 or a 300-level Spanish course, or by permission.  Offered periodically, semester course, three hours. 

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 320. MODERN SPAIN.  A study of the events and ideas which have shaped Spain with an emphasis on the evolution of socioeconomic and political structures, cultural achievements and traditions from the seventeenth century to the present.  Through readings, videos, discussions and presentations, students will develop an understanding of how Spain's rich history contributes to the daily life of contemporary Spain (politics, religion, family, social issues and other current topics) and influences the ways in which Spaniards view themselves and the world. Students are required to consult Spanish news sources on the Internet regularly.  Prerequisite: Spanish 295 or a 300-level Spanish course, or by permission. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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 322. LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE I. A survey of the twenty-one Latin American republics, their history and civilization, people and society, arts and letters, customs, geography, and cultural accomplishments. This course fulfills the Speaking Intensive (SI) requirement for the Spanish major. Prerequisite: Spanish 295 or a 300 level Spanish course, or by permission. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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 323. LATIN AMERICAN CIVILIZATION AND CULTURE II. A cultural understanding of Latin America including identity issues, "mestizaje," socio-political characteristics, and patterns of thought and expression in language, literature, philosophy, and art. The course also examines the effects of the Spanish conquest upon the development of Latin American society. This course fulfills the Speaking Intensive (SI) requirement for the Spanish major. Prerequisite: Spanish 295 or a 300 level Spanish course, or by permission.

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 326. Trends in Latin American Literature. A study of the literature of Latin America from the pre-Columbian era to the beginning of the 20th century. This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL)  and Writing Intensive (WI) requirements for the Spanish major.  Prerequisite: Spanish 306.Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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327. Contemporary Latin American Authors. A survey with readings from representative works of the most important 20th century authors in Latin American literature.  This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) and Writing Intensive (WI) requirements for the Spanish major.  Prerequisite: Spanish 306. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours. 

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 330. Genres of Spanish Literature I.  A study of representative authors and works of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Golden Age with exposure to various approaches to the reading and interpretation of literary works.  This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL)  and Writing Intensive (WI) requirements for the Spanish major.  Prerequisite: Spanish 306.Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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 331. GENRES OF SPANISH LITERATURE II.  A study of the major genres and works from eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Spain.  This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) and Writing Intensive (WI) requirements for the Spanish major.  Prerequisite:  Spanish 306. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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333. CONTEMPORARY SPANISH AUTHORS.  A survey with readings from representative works of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  This course fulfills the Information Literacy (IL) and Writing Intensive (WI) requirements for the Spanish major.  Prerequisite:  Spanish 306. Offered periodically, semester course, three hours. 

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340. ADVANCED GRAMMAR FOR PROFICIENCY I. A thorough review and expansion of the basic elements of Spanish grammar and the study of finer grammatical points, with applications to written and oral proficiency.  Required of Spanish majors and those desiring teacher certification in Spanish.  Prerequisite: Spanish 306. Alternate fall semesters, three hours.

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341. ADVANCED GRAMMAR FOR PROFICIENCY II. Continued review and expansion of the basic elements of Spanish grammar and the study of finer grammatical points, with applications to written and oral proficiency.  Required of Spanish majors and those desiring teacher certification in Spanish.  Prerequisite: Spanish 340. Alternate spring semesters, three hrs.

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362. ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE LEARNING.  A course designed to provide opportunities to teach various grammar aspects in the Spanish/French language, and to examine and implement a variety of technological aspects and resources in the foreign language curriculum in preparation for student teaching.  Teacher candidates will regularly reflect on their teaching experiences and will develop a portfolio of materials representing their teaching in the target language.  Required of all students desiring teacher certification in a foreign language.   Co-requisite:  Spanish 364.  Spring semester of the sophomore year, two hours.

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 364. PEDAGOGICAL MATERIALS. Introduction to the materials and resources of foreign language teaching.  Analysis and preparation of instructional and evaluative materials in a specific target language.  Required of all students desiring teacher certification in a foreign language.  Co-requisite:  Spanish 362.Spring semester of the sophomore year, two hours.

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375.  SPANISH FOR THE PROFESSIONS.  Training in vocabulary, reading comprehension, and oral and written skills for the utilization of Spanish in professions such as communications, social services, business, education, health professions, law, tourism, computer applications, and engineering.  Designed for advanced-level students who wish to pursue their study of Spanish in combination with another field.  Pre-requisite:  Spanish 295 or a 300-level Spanish course, or by permission.  Offered periodically, semester course, 3 hours.

 

390. STUDIES IN SPANISH. Readings and discussion of topics in literature or language. Subject matter varies. Offered periodically, Semester course, one, two or three hours.

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 420. Written Translation and Simultaneous Oral Interpretation.  Training and practice in the techniques of translation and interpretation with development of the non-literary vocabulary needed for professional skills.  Prerequisite: Spanish 306.  Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.   

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424.  HISPANICS IN THE U.S.  A study of the life-styles, heritage, influence, thoughts, and experiences of Cuban, Puerto Rican, Mexican American, Dominican, and other Spanish speakers in the United States today.  Through extensive reading, videos and discussion, we will explore contemporary issues and topics of interest such as demographics, immigration, discrimination, workers' rights, education, the arts, customs, beliefs and daily life.  The course will foster a greater awareness of the similarities and differences existing between these communities, as well as their contributions to American society. Of particular interest to students of sociology and political science.  Required of Spanish majors and those desiring teacher certification in Spanish.  Prerequisite: Spanish 306.  Alternate fall semesters, three hours.

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 460. Independent Study. Individual study directed by a faculty member, with permission of the department chairman. Semester course, one or two hours. This course is a temporary assignment until an approved independent study form is submitted to the registrar's office. Formal registration and credit assignment will only occur after submission of this form.

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Chinese

101. ELEMENTARY CHINESE I. This first-year course is designed to lay a foundation for those who are interested in using Mandarin Chinese as a linguistic tool to communicate and further appreciate the Chinese culture.  It aims at developing learners’ overall competence in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and culture awareness with special emphasis on oral-aural skills for true beginners.  A learner-centered, task-based, and proficiency-driven approach will be employed.  Christian value will be integrated throughout the semester.  Students will learn hymns in Chinese immediately.  Class is highly interactive.  Visual aids, authentic materials, and multimedia language resources will be incorporated to enhance learning effectiveness.  Regular and active participation in class is expected.  Grade is based on daily performance, homework, quizzes, lesson tests, oral and written exams.  Prerequisite: None.  Fall semester only, three hours.

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102. ELEMENTARY CHINESE II. This first-year course is designed to continue to lay the groundwork for the study of modern Chinese.  It aims to develop learners’ overall Chinese competence in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and intercultural communication with special emphasis on oral-aural skills.  A learner-centered, task-based, and proficiency-driven approach will be employed.  Christian value will be integrated throughout the semester.  Hymns and Chinese Bible verses (in Pinyin) will be used as instructional tools.  Students will have opportunities to talk about their lives, perform skits, read signs, and write journal entries in Chinese.  Visual aids, authentic materials, and multimedia language resources will be integrated to facilitate classroom learning as well as independent learning.  Regular and active participation in class is expected.  Grade is based on daily performance, homework, quizzes, lesson tests, oral and written exams.  Prerequisite: Chinese 101.  Spring semester only, three hours.

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105. Business Chinese I. is a beginning Mandarin Chinese course with a special focus on business communication.  It is the first level of a three-level series, covering basic daily corporate interactions and business-related social exchanges such as: socializing, establishing and maintaining good relations (guānxì, a key word for doing business in Asia), scheduling meetings, visiting a company, inquiring about products, business etiquette, etc.  Christian values will be integrated throughout the course.  It is designed for learners with no prior knowledge of the Chinese language and culture.  Ample authentic materials are provided for learners to visualize contemporary China.  Classes are conducted mainly in Chinese, with clear grammatical and cultural highlighting in English.  Students will be assigned to perform simple tasks to enhance language use.  Active participation in class is required.  Grade is based on class performance, homework, quizzes, oral and written tests.  Prerequisite: None.  Spring semester only, three hours.

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201. Intermediate Chinese I This second year course is designed to build on the foundation of first year Chinese to help learners achieve greater fluency in the spoken and written use of the Chinese language, as well as to increase their vocabulary and familiarity with common sentence patterns.  Topics and scenarios shift from college daily life here in the US to daily tasks that one needs to fulfill in China.  A learner-centered, task-based, and proficiency-driven approach will be employed.  Christian value will be integrated throughout the semester. Regular and active participation in class is required.  Grade is based on daily performance, homework assignments, quizzes, oral and written tests.  Prerequisite: Chinese 102 or consent.  Fall semester only, three hours.

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202. Intermediate Chinese II. This second-year course is designed to further develop learners’ overall language proficiency.  Students will have opportunities to talk about their lives, perform skits, read simple stories, and write journals.  Christian value will be integrated throughout the semester.  Visual aids (on everyday life in China), authentic materials, and multimedia language resources will also be incorporated to enhance learning effectiveness.  Towards the end of this course, students will be able to achieve the following: understand simple paragraph-length utterances and over longer stretches of some connected discourses on a number of topics beyond basic survival needs; handle successfully most communicative tasks and social situations and support one’s opinions using simple discourse strategies; read consistently with full understanding simple connected text; write short letters, brief synopses, summaries, biographical data of work and school experience in some details.  Regular and active participation in class is required.  Grade is based on daily performance, homework assignments, quizzes, oral and written tests.  Prerequisite: Chinese 201 or consent.  Spring semester only, three hours.

 

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205 Business Chinese II. is the continuation of Chinese105 (Business Chinese I).  It focuses on practical language skills that are most helpful in actual business interactions with Chinese-speaking communities (i.e. China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore).  Chinese and Kingdom culture will also be integrated throughout the course.  Classroom activities are task-based and largely in the form of real world simulation.  Students will work mainly in groups throughout the semester, with each group represents a company.  Some highlights include: business negotiation in international trade, short business letter writing, simple business documents comprehension, business oral presentation, commercial language and word processing.  Through intensive practice in the listening, speaking, reading, and writing of the Chinese language for business purposes, students will enhance their cultural awareness and acquire vocabulary, phrases and sentence patterns commonly used in typical Chinese business contexts.  Classes are conducted mainly in Chinese.  Active participation in class is required.  Grade is based on class performance, homework assignments, quizzes, oral presentations and written tests.  Prerequisite: Chinese 105, 102, or consent.  Spring semester only, three hours.

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301. Advanced Chinese I This third-year course is conducted entirely in Chinese.  It is learner-centered, content-based, and proficiency-driven.  It seeks to further develop learners’ overall language proficiency through extensive reading of modern texts in various styles.  Students will have opportunities to narrate personal experience, discuss current social problems, and explore cultural issues at discourse level.  Topic includes Chinese food, holidays, education, traditional Chinese medicine, leisure and entertainment.  Christian perspective on these topics will be the focus of class discussion.  Strategies in serving God with our life and profession will be integrated in this course.  Regular and active participation in class is required.  Grade is based on daily performance, homework assignments, quizzes, oral presentations, and written tests.  Prerequisite: Chinese 202 or consent.  Fall semester only, three hours.

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302. Advanced Chinese II This third-year course aims at further vocabulary expansion, consolidation of essential sentence structures of contemporary Chinese through extensive reading and related conversation.  Students will start learning phrases of written/formal language (shūmiàn yǔ) which is different from daily colloquial/informal language.  There will also be plenty opportunities for learners to express their personal opinions on current social and cultural issues at discourse level.  Topics are very culture-oriented.  Learners will discuss in the Chinese language contemporary China social and cultural trends such as: marriage then and now, population, economics policies and reforms, government and politics, and environmental protection.  Christian value will be integrated throughout the semester.  Regular and active participation in class is required.  Grade is based on daily performance, assignments, quizzes, oral presentations, and written tests.  Prerequisite: Chinese 301 or consent.  Spring semester only, three hours.

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305. Business Chinese III is an advanced Chinese language course designed for students who are interested in international business with Chinese enterprises in Chinese-speaking communities.  Classroom activities, task-based and largely in the form of real world simulation, will be based on authentic documents and correspondence as well as a course packet.  More specifically, students will increase knowledge of business and professional terminology; learn business practices and customs; practice giving formal presentations; read business related articles and statistical information; review business documents including invoices, shipping documents, bank statements, sales and purchase contract, brochures introducing new products, and other business letters involving import and export trade; write basic business letters; develop the ability to distinguish the stylistic differences between formal and informal correspondences, colloquial and written Chinese, and be able to write formal business letter in the appropriate format with the correct register.  Strategies in serving God with our life and profession will be integrated in this course.  The course will be conducted entirely in Chinese.  Students are expected to fully participate in discussions in Mandarin Chinese.  Grade is based on class performance, assignments, quizzes, oral presentations, and written tests.  Prerequisite: Chinese 205, 301, or consent.  Spring semester only, three hours.

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320. INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE CIVILIZATION.  A survey of Chinese history and civilization including social, political, economic, and cultural developments.  Prerequisite: Chinese 302 or by permission.  Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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321. MODERN CHINA.  A study of the cultural, political, economic, and social issues of contemporary China.   Prerequisite: Chinese 302 or by permission.  Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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350. INTRODUCTION TO CHINESE LITERATURE.  A study on China’s history, society, culture, and philosophies through traditional and modern Chinese literature.  Prerequisite: Chinese 302 or by permission.  Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

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390. STUDIES IN CHINESE.  Readings and discussion of topics in literature or language.  Subject matter varies.  Prerequisite: Chinese 302 or by permission.  Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

 

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401. Advanced Chinese III This fourth-year course is designed for learners of Chinese who seek to improve their overall language skills and the development of skills to approach authentic written texts.  Extensive reading and colloquial and written usage building are major emphases of the course, while speaking and writing are incorporated in class discussions, oral reports, and essay assignments.  Bible verses reading (in characters) will be used as part of the authentic materials.  Students are expected to prepare thoroughly before coming to class, and participate in discussions.  Attendance is mandatory.  Other requirements include regular writing exercises, dictations, presentations, and tests.  Prerequisite: Chinese 302 or consent.  Fall semester only, three hours.

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402. Advanced Chinese IV This fourth-year course is designed for advanced learners of Chinese to improve their overall language proficiency through extensive reading of texts in various topics, styles, or genres.  Learners will also acquire a deeper understanding of major issues concerning modern Chinese intellectuals as well as a fuller picture of contemporary Chinese life and society.  In addition, they will obtain skills needed to be independent and confident learners of Chinese.  Unique strategies on how to share Gospel with Chinese (different from other culture or language speakers) will be introduced.  Attendance is mandatory.  Active participation in class is expected.  Grade is based on class performance, comprehension exercises, oral presentations, composition assignments, journal entries, and a term project.  Prerequisite: Chinese 401 or consent.  Spring semester only, three hours.

 

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403. INTRODCTION TO CLASSICAL CHINESE I.  An introduction to wenyan, the traditional written language of China, through the study of selections from ancient texts.  Includes grammatical analysis and translation into baihua (modern Chinese); discussion will be in modern Chinese.  Prerequisite: Chinese 302.  Offered periodically, semester course, three hours.

 

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460. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN CHINESE.  Individual study directed by a faculty member, with permission of the department chairman.  Semester course, one, two, or three hours.

 

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Global

290. Studies in Modern Language. Readings and discussion of topics in literature or language. Subject matter varies. Semester course, one, two or three hours.

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 300. INTERNATIONAL MANNERS AND MORES. This course deals with foreign cultures, customs, and "how they think". Although it is especially directed at the problems faced by the international businessperson who needs to create trust and understanding in order to function effectively in a foreign culture, the course also has proven to be of value for students in other majors who plan to work, study and/or travel abroad. Spring semester only, three hours.

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 390. Studies in Modern Language.  Readings and discussion of topics in literature or language.  Subject matter varies.  Semester course, one, two, or three hours.

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 460. Independent Study. Individual study directed by a faculty member, with permission of the department chairman. Semester course, one or two hours.

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© Grove City College - For questions contact Dr. Barber - Last updated October 2009