Course Offerings in Philosophy

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161. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY.

191. INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS.

201. SYMBOLIC LOGIC.

211. GENERAL LOGIC.

243. FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE.

251. DEFENDING THE FAITH.

255. LANGUAGE, MIND, AND REALITY.

271. BIO-MEDICAL ETHICS.

290. STUDIES IN PHILOSOPHY.

334. PLATO AND ARISTOTLE.

336. AUGUSTINE AND AQUINAS.

339. MODERN PHILOSOPHY.

340. PHILOSOPHY OF LAW.

360. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION.

361. FAITH AND LEARNING.

371. TWENTIETH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY.

380. CURRENT PROBLEMS IN PHILOSOPHY.

390. ADVANCED STUDIES IN PHILOSOPHY.

460. INDEPENDENT STUDY.

 

161. INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY.

A course designed to acquaint the student with the various fields and problems of philosophy. Primary sources are used.

Semester course, three hours.

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191. INTRODUCTION TO ETHICS.

A study of moral theory and the insight of principal figures whose ideas have shaped ethical understanding. The course begins with Plato and concludes with contemporary twentieth century ethicists. Primary sources are used.

Semester course, three hours.

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201. SYMBOLIC LOGIC.

A study of formal deductive logic with emphasis on testing arguments for validity and translating English statements into symbolic notation. Truth tables, tautologies, contradictions, quantifiers, relations, and identity are included.

Semester course, three hours.

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211. GENERAL LOGIC.

A study of reasoning in a variety of contexts. Attention is given to both inductive and deductive arguments. Many kinds of fallacies are studied as well as traditional syllogisms and logical puzzles. Diagramming techniques are developed.

Semester course, three hours.

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243. FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE.

This course may include such issues as the nature of scientific theories, the nature of scientific explanation and causality, the justification of scientific beliefs, and how to understand scientific revolutions. Some attention may be given to the relationship between science and either metaphysics or religion. Prerequisite: HUMA 101; 102 (or RELI 211 and 212); and a lab science. The lab science may be taken concurrently with this course.

Offered alternate years, semester course, two or three hours.

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251. DEFENDING THE FAITH.

This course will investigate evidential, presupposition, postmodern, and other approaches to apologetics. The emphasis will be on the epistemological stance one should take in apologetic encounters. A portion of this course will focus on responses to various objections and concerns that one is likely to face in apologetic encounters.

Semester course, three hours.

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255. LANGUAGE, MIND, AND REALITY.

This course is concerned with the semantics (meaning, truth, and reference) of natural languages and the semantic connections of language with the mind and external reality. What are concepts and how are they formed may also be considered.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

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271. BIO-MEDICAL ETHICS.

An introduction to the ethical issues arising in the field of biomedicine. Topics covered include issues such as abortion, eugenics, euthanasia, organ transplantation, behavior control, the right of a patient to refuse treatment, etc.

Semester course, three hours.

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290. STUDIES IN PHILOSOPHY.

The subject matter for this course will vary each semester to allow for the introduction of new courses in the field of philosophy.

Semester course, three hours.

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334. PLATO AND ARISTOTLE.

A survey of Western philosophy from the early Greeks through Aristotle. Special attention will be given to the philosophies of Aristotle and Plato. Primary sources are used. This course fulfills the Writing Intensive (WI) and Information Literacy (IL) requirement for the Philosophy major.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

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336. AUGUSTINE AND AQUINAS.

A study of the thought of prominent philosophers from St. Augustine to Ockham. Primary sources are used.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

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339. MODERN PHILOSOPHY.

A survey of Western philosophy from Descartes through Kant. Primary sources are used. This course is one choice that fulfills the Speaking Intensive (SI) requirement for the philosophy major.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

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340. PHILOSOPHY OF LAW.

This course commonly examines such topics as the nature of law, the relationship of law to morality, the problem of judicial interpretation, justice, and rights.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

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360. PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION.

This course may include one or more of such central issues as the problem of religious language; religious epistemology and the relationship between faith and reason; the attributes of God; or the arguments for the existence of God. The course could address other areas of theology where philosophical concepts or techniques may prove enlightening or where theology casts light on the problems of philosophy.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

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361. FAITH AND LEARNING.

The central focus of this course is a study of the relationship between what we learn in the liberal arts and what we learn from scripture focusing specifically on the relation between Christian theology and science and Christian theology and philosophy, although other disciplines may also be considered.

Semester course, three hours.

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371. TWENTIETH CENTURY PHILOSOPHY.

A study of representative thinkers in twentieth century philosophy including key figures in the analytic and pragmatism movements. Primary sources are used. This course is one choice that fulfills the speaking Intensive (SI) requirement for the Philosophy major. Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

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380. CURRENT PROBLEMS IN PHILOSOPHY.

A study of contemporary issues in philosophy from a variety of fields. This course may be repeated, as topics covered vary per semester. Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.

Offered alternate years, semester course, three hours.

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390. ADVANCED STUDIES IN PHILOSOPHY.

The subject matter for this course will vary each semester to allow for the introduction of new courses in the field of philosophy.

Semester course, three hours.

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460. INDEPENDENT STUDY.

An opportunity for junior and senior students with previous background in philosophy to do intensive independent study of specialized topics. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of philosophy or consent of the department.

Semester course, three hours.

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